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  • By the author of The Conservative Resurgence and the Press: The Media’s Role in the Rise of the Right and of Journalism at the End of the American Century, 1965-Present. A former journalist with a Ph.D. in journalism, history and political science, McPherson is a past president of the American Journalism Historians Association and a board member for the Northwest Alliance for Responsible Media.

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Labor ‘wobbles’ or we all fall down: Belaboring a point about why unions matter

Posted by James McPherson on September 2, 2012

Labor Day is here, marking the unofficial end of summer–a time for every little rich kid to stop wearing white while poor kids risk getting maimed in factories. And if junior should happen to lose a limb or an eye while on the job, then mom and dad can spend some of their 60-hour work week trying to figure out how to pay the hospital bill, since their jobs provides no insurance.

What, that’s not how you think of Labor Day? You probably think I’m just exaggerating, perhaps to take another shot at the mean visions for America produced by folks lik Mitt RomneyPaul Ryan and Newt Gingrich. But no, I think that this weekend is the ideal time to remind us all of what we owe laborers in this country, particularly those laborers who fought to make things better for all workers–and therefore for all of us.

Remember when having a few Americans–say, more than 3,200 in a single year–die in mines was no big deal? Or when a person could be fired–or shot or lynched–for protesting dismal work conditions? You probably don’t remember it, but if some people (mostly Republicans) had their way we could go back there. There is no doubt that companies are doing better than their employees.

Admittedly, unions have been prone as other human endeavors to corruption, and some union members show a selfish, short-sighted streak when it comes to their neighbors–a regrettable attitude because it’s a view that (when held by others) weakens the influence of labor and the earning power of workers. The most notable example I’ve come across recently was a Wisconsin union worker (whom I won’t name) who offered a troubling combination of views within a space of moments.

“I can explain as best I can all of the horrible things that have happened to me in my work life, and everybody’s like, ‘Well, then find a new job,’ but it’s not that simple. And somebody still has to do the job one way or the other,” said the worker, who, according to the piece, “got really fired up in the fight to defend his union.”

“”I’ve never been involved in politics until what happened in 2011 was thrown in my lap, and I realized how much I’ve been affected by it,” he was quoted as saying–before then going on to complain about Obamacare:

“I don’t think that we should have a national health care plan [in which] everybody is put in the same category,” he says. “I feel like I joined the Department of Corrections, and I continue to work for the Department of Corrections because I have excellent health benefits. … So if health benefits are important to you, I feel like you should be able to go out and find a job where you can get excellent health benefits.”

Hmm. Really? When it comes to finding that a job with “excellent health benefits,” especially with ongoing Republican efforts to weaken unions, it seems as though someone might suggest “It’s not that simple.” And when it comes to those other less “excellent” jobs, it seems as though some wise person might point out, “Somebody still has to do the job one way or the other.” Right? Sigh.

By the way, if you’re too young to understand the pun in the headline above or don’t remember your labor history–or if you just want to see cool video of an old toy commercial–you can go here. And happy Labor Day, to all who work and all who wish they could in these difficult times. Below are a few of my favorite reminders of how far we have come, starting with the incomparable Paul Robeson singing the labor ballad “Joe Hill”–also sung by a trio in my church today (as my pastor, who preached about the value of work and workers, wore a long-sleeved T-shirt that had been given to her by the local sheet metal workers’ union), and which I’ve also heard performed in person by Utah Phillips.

P.S.: Here’s a quiz to test your knowledge of Labor Day.

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32 Responses to “Labor ‘wobbles’ or we all fall down: Belaboring a point about why unions matter”

  1. You are restoring my confidence in journalism, sir. TY

  2. augger said

    “a time for every little rich kid to stop wearing white while poor kids risk getting maimed in factories.”

    James, you can do a little better than this. I’m that “little rich kid”, and I lost fingers while working as a “kid”. Seriously, you are better than this.

    “figure out how to pay the hospital bill, since their jobs provides no insurance.”

    Yep, and under our new Universal Healthcare, we’ve already seen the disastrous effects of this, now haven’t we? 54% of all physicians no longer accept Medicaid/Medicare patients, while another 10% now charge a year fee for the privilege of allowing you to call them your physician. These new “medical clubs” average $1650-$3400 dollars per year, and the fee does not include co-pays in many cases. Bottom line, having insurance does nothing to ensure you get care. But hey, there’s always the ER for care right?

    James, labor unions have made themselves irrelevant over the years with their own corruption, and continuous myopic lobbying and crony practices. It’s just as easy to blame the Republicans as it is to blame Bush for every “problem in America”, and that’s fine if you want too, but it is a simpleton’s simplistic rationalization … and honestly, fodder for the intellectual paupers by intellectual paupers.

    In the face of Universal Healthcare, you don not want union extension. Some states (Florida comes to mind), do not allow medical professionals (as well as others) to go on strike, and that is very likely a good thing. Imagine yourself showing up to the ER with a wife having a heart attack only to find that nurses, techs, and physicians are in short supply because of a union strike. 🙂

  3. James McPherson said

    MsJackson, though I haven’t considered myself a journalist for years, thanks.

    Reuel, obviously (or so I thought) that first paragraph was intended as exaggeration. I also worked as a kid (though was fortunate enough to avoid serious injury), but I certainly don’t want to return to a time when poor children were routinely employed in factories because their hands were small enough to reach quickly between moving metal parts.

    Nor do I want to return to a time when hospitals were places only for the near-dead and dying, when most babies were born at home where it was “safer.” I’m not thrilled with Obamacare, but the system we’ve had hasn’t been working for far too many Americans.

    “Some states (Florida comes to mind), do not allow medical professionals (as well as others) to go on strike, and that is very likely a good thing.”

    Probably so–but that doesn’t mean those health care professionals shouldn’t be allowed to enter into unions where they can bargain for what’s in their own best interest, rather than each individual being forced to negotiate with his/her own employer–while subject to be being fired at will, if the employer things the worker is asking for too much, or might be a “problem” in any way.

    Perhaps I can do better, as you put it. But so can we as a nation do better. Thanks.

  4. […] Labor ‘wobbles’ or we all fall down: Belaboring a point about why unions matter […]

  5. melfamy said

    You deserve more than 3 comments for this, one of the few blogs to celebrate the Holiday and its meaning.

  6. augger said

    “Reuel, obviously (or so I thought) that first paragraph was intended as exaggeration. I also worked as a kid (though was fortunate enough to avoid serious injury), but I certainly don’t want to return to a time when poor children were routinely employed in factories because their hands were small enough to reach quickly between moving metal parts.”

    It was actually my response, not Reuel’s, and I am sorry I missed your exaggeration. Was difficult to extrapolate the ‘tone’. Seems like the Kardashian family who supports and endorsed our current leadership, also endorses and sells fashion products not only manufactured in foreign countries, but also employs child labor. Interesting.

    “Nor do I want to return to a time when hospitals were places only for the near-dead and dying, when most babies were born at home where it was “safer.” I’m not thrilled with Obamacare, but the system we’ve had hasn’t been working for far too many Americans.”

    Obamacare did little to “reform” anything. Once you understand that, you will never made that assertion again. 🙂

    “Probably so–but that doesn’t mean those health care professionals shouldn’t be allowed to enter into unions where they can bargain for what’s in their own best interest, rather than each individual being forced to negotiate with his/her own employer–while subject to be being fired at will, if the employer things the worker is asking for too much, or might be a “problem” in any way.”

    Without the power to “strike”, Unions have little teeth to bargain with. And like I said, the last thing you want is an understaffed hospital caring for you, or your loved ones because the staff is on strike. 🙂

    “Perhaps I can do better, as you put it. But so can we as a nation do better. Thanks.”

    Ah, you’re just fine, and yes we could actually do better. We have not seriously addressed tort reform, which other than the crazy insurance companies, is another top cause of overpricing…defensive medicine. The politicians never will though, they’re all attorneys.

    Pre-existing clauses need to go, but as part of a different overhaul. The program appears to offer a model like the UK, but will likely trend closer to the Canadian system once large employers dump the more costly private plans.

    There will need to be rationing and then we’ll begin to see the domino effect from that.

    I do not think the USPS runs anywhere as well as UPS or FedEx and IMHO, I believe the same will be said of government-run healthcare.

    We will all find out soon enough and I hope that it won’t be at the expense of what was once considered the best health care in the world.

  7. James McPherson said

    @ Greg: Thanks much.

    @ Augger: “It was actually my response, not Reuel’s.”

    Sorry; that was dumb on my part. That’s what I get for trying to check it in a hurry, knowing I’d be gone all day.

    “Obamacare did little to “reform” anything.”

    Perhaps so. Not nearly enough of anything, anyway. But my main point was that doing nothing obviously wasn’t working, either. Your suggestions for improvement make sense to me–probably too much for the politicians, as you suggested. Thanks–and again, sorry for failing to pay attention to whom I was writing.

  8. Reuel said

    Augger; I guess are remarks made could be read quickly and seem pretty similar. But you are more eloquent in expressing my thoughts. Thank you. I have been reading James work for some time and knew the first part was for the shock and awe. I got that part and moved on to the Health Scare part and agree the new law has more faults than good. But Unions of the past were a good thing and now that they have spread like bedbugs in Charlotte NC (yes they are a problem in most hotels around the DNC) in the public sector it has made a huge dent in government budgets. On top of that is has protected the many people whom if they performed as poorly in the private sector would out of a job. Then they lined up and supported this Health Scare Law before they ask for a wavier from it. Augger you are correct and I see the same things happening across the country when this Health Scare Law is in full force. I also see many companies are just going to remove health care from its plans and just pay the “Tax”. The private sector union membership have now become by numbers larger than the private sector union membership. Soon the reality of a person working until they are 55 and living until they are 90 will become impossible to maintain at the current golden parachute they are offered.

  9. augger said

    “Perhaps so. Not nearly enough of anything, anyway. But my main point was that doing nothing obviously wasn’t working, either. Your suggestions for improvement make sense to me–probably too much for the politicians, as you suggested. Thanks–and again, sorry for failing to pay attention to whom I was writing.”

    – No apologies are necessary. We are at that age group …. 🙂
    – About the politicians – well, they answer to lobbyist often, and seldom to the people. I actually have a healthcare proposal penned. It’s sitting on the RNL. 🙂

    Reuel – once a solution to a problem, the Unions have largely become a majority of the problem. Politicians will have to kill Obamacare. Between the physicians, and the patient’s both railing against it … it is practically dead already. It has simply become the abscess on the ass for too many people.

    As above, a healthcare “manifesto” (if you will) has been penned, and posted. It’s also been printed. Gaining traction, and may one day have to be seriously re-written in to something more substantial. You are welcome to check it out at the RNL as well. It’s titled “Aligning Healthcare With Reality …”

  10. James McPherson said

    Thanks, Augger. And feel free to post a direct link to your piece here. I would, but I figure it’s easier for you to find than for me.

  11. Why the hello did you post a pic of workers sleeping on the job for Labor Day?

    This post reminds me of a book called The Jungle. I understand the need for regulations and unions, but they have, in my opinion, exceeded their bounds. My son is 12, and is very adept at making a buck……or 20.

    Consider this: Were healthcare reformed in such a manner that your employer and your lawyer were removed from the picture, would that not equal more affordable healthcare? Just thinkin out loud, here.

    Kudos on the musical choices. 😉 Here’s a belated Labor Day song for you…. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7QF32mxftE

  12. James McPherson said

    If you click on the photo, Kells, you’ll see an article explaining why the women in the photo are dead, not sleeping. And I agree that unions have problems, but I’d argue that we ought to fix the problems, not take away rights of workers to negotiate together. And thanks for the link–from one of my favorite movies.

  13. augger said

    James, are you proposing even more government regulation to “fix” these unions?

    Cement is preferable to even MORE government extension.

  14. James McPherson said

    “are you proposing even more government regulation to “fix” these unions?”

    Not necessarily, though I’m also not supporting pro-business government efforts to kill or weaken unions. Part of the reason unions became as powerful as they did (though they’re nowhere close to what they were) is because of corruption within the unions–and I do support government investigation of and prosecution for corruption. That’s also why we need more, not fewer, IRS agents–but that’s a whole other thread’s worth. 🙂

    But part of the union “problems” resulted because of negotiating by the businesses (or government entities) that now looks bad in retrospect, so the folks on the other side now want to change the terms of the deals.

  15. Dang, James! Could you not tell that was a sick joke? Sheesh! Guess I need to add an emoticon when I say something that I think is twisted and funny.

  16. James McPherson said

    Sorry, Kells, my mistake. And as a former reporter who covered the police beat, I of all people should recognize and appreciate such jokes.

  17. augger said

    “Not necessarily, though I’m also not supporting pro-business government efforts to kill or weaken unions. Part of the reason unions became as powerful as they did (though they’re nowhere close to what they were) is because of corruption within the unions–and I do support government investigation of and prosecution for corruption. That’s also why we need more, not fewer, IRS agents–but that’s a whole other thread’s worth. 🙂

    But part of the union “problems” resulted because of negotiating by the businesses (or government entities) that now looks bad in retrospect, so the folks on the other side now want to change the terms of the deals.”

    You have to remember … capitalism, and not socialism rules the economy here. Not the government, and not the unions.

    I remember back in Charleston, SC (want to say the year was 1988). Unions came in, and tried to unionize the employees of the Robert Bosch Corporation (a German held company). Upon hearing of the attempt at organizing, one of the CEOs flew in from Germany and called a meeting with the employees as well as the union reps. The meeting was short, sweet, and directly to the point. (I’ll never forget it as it made the local news in a major way).

    He just simply said that if you wanted to unionize, so be it. We’ll lock the gates, and move our fuel injector production out of the state or country.

    End of unionization there.

    By the way, Bosch is known for how well they treat their some 303+ thousand employees.

  18. James McPherson said

    “Bosch is known for how well they treat their some 303+ thousand employees.”

    That’s great, so chances are the union vote would have failed, anyway. But suppose they didn’t treat workers well, and simply said, “OK, we can treat you like dirt and you’ll like it, or we can ship your jobs to China or Mexico, or simply bring in undocumented workers to do the work. And by the way, we’ll also foul the air you breathe and dump toxic waste into the water. And if you want to keep your job, we get to shoot video of you using the bathroom (just to make sure you’re not abusing drugs in there), women have to wear miniskirts, you have to be between 21 and 35 years old and physically attractive (managers will check in one-on-one meetings), and your child has to mow our lawn.” Company officials can use their “threat to move” in reaction to anything. As a pure capitalist, I’m sure you’re OK with that–but it’s not good for the American economy as a whole, even if it is good for Bosch.

    They apparently don’t pay as well as some, which of course is why they’re in South Carolina: http://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Robert-Bosch-LLC-Reviews-E4293.htm

  19. augger said

    “we can ship your jobs to China or Mexico” — pretty much what GM did James.

    The answer is not to “regulate” private business (though I do agree with regulation of toxins). There is an old saying in business:

    “Employees will work just hard enough to keep their jobs, while employers will pay just enough to keep their workers.”

    Where does this change begin? I say with the worker. If a worker works like he wants a raise, the employer will respond with one in order to retain his services. Have you ever wondered why medical folks can always find a job? It’s not because an ever ending supply of patients (feast or famine in healthcare), but rather people can move their licenses much easier than a hospital can move it’s building.

    So what’s the difference? I have no idea. Anyone can ‘move’ to greener pastures, maybe medical folks are just simply more aware of that fact.

  20. augger said

    http://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Robert-Bosch-LLC-Charleston-Reviews-EI_IE4293.0,16_IL.17,27_IM161.htm

    Numbers look much better in Charleston where my son works. 🙂

  21. James McPherson said

    And it’s always nice when the kids are gainfully employed. 🙂

  22. augger said

    Especially when it costs so much to get them educated. lol

  23. Reuel said

    Yes Augger, I just finished with my youngest last year and for some reason the cost went up the last two year at a higher rate than the average, then I found out that the Government unleashed something in the Health care act or near the time of that bill that took control of all the leading on all loans thru FAFSA. My guess is the schools knew it was in the governments hands and the students didn’t care how much it was so they just signed up. Collages raised cost. Lucky I squeaked by without borrowing, but my daughter friends that graduated the same year as her are now paying huge monthly loan payments and the parents had no idea it was a loan and what their children were paying for these last two years. On couple I know asked and their daughter said don’t worry about it, it going to save us money, whatever!, they thought it was going to cost less than the money they were borrowing and were told by their kids that some of the cost would be covered by grants thanks to President Obama. Now I understand when they say they increased the amount of money for the education system. But it was all Debt. I haven’t figured it all out yet but something happen that year( 2009) and I know a whole lot of students that supported this President in 2008 are learning a lesson in nothing is for free. I ask them to see if they could find any documentation they had from that time frame, but doubt they even keep the agreement they said they had to sign. If this happened nation wide, I think the youth vote will drop drastically. James your in Higher Education, do you remember any “Change” that year?

  24. James McPherson said

    Something Augger and I have in common: We’re in too of the most inflationary fields there are, medicine and education. I don’t fully know the reasons for either, though I know several things work together to create the mess. Perhaps someday I’ll take the time to research both and compare the reasons.

  25. Reuel said

    Medicine and education both increase the value of life. One is the bridge to a more rewarding life and the other extends the time to enjoy the rewards. Well they use to. Education today is pretty much a production process and universities seem to be producing a lot Political Science majors, that intend to either become a Lawyer or serve in government. In turn these two professions have complicated both education and medicine. One wants to regulate it and the other makes money off of suing it. Both are what are raising the cost of it. Now Engineering as I studied and may I say has many openings even today in this economy has a real proof test when you are done. If you don’t use good Engineer practices it is not a talking point or spin. It usually blows up in your face and it is quite clear what was the problem. It is also based on a known quantity, proven mathematical equations with large factors of safety. Go into any coffee shop around this country and you will find a bunch of Political Science Majors that are Bar vistas(SP). Usually not a lot of Doctors or Engineers. The cost of everything seems to be based on to many Lawyers and Law Makers I would think. But they sure can make a excellent Triple Granada Marble Mocha.

  26. jm said

    Having been a card carrying member of several unions while working odd jobs going through school, I agree unions matter. They are worthy of recognition for protecting workers’ rights.

    But, I have a problem with school teachers going on strike and affecting the lives and careers of young people. It’s one thing to be a member of the Teamsters and to stage a strike on the docks because of working conditions and wages. It’s quite another matter to shut down schools and to send young people to the streets who should be in school.

    What struck me were the tepid reactions of Governor Romney and President Obama to the Chicago teachers’ strike.

    Considering that the Chicago public school system receives tens or possibly even hundreds of millions in federal grants, I would expect stronger intervention by the Administration and the leaders of Congress, and stronger initiatives from Candidate Romney.

    Perhaps it is the case that when it comes to education, politicians simply don’t give it the priority it deserves.

  27. William Gates said

    As much as I understand the point of the school system receiving federal funds, I don’t think that Obama, Romney, Ryan or congress should do anything at this point but have an opinion concerning the strike . It’s Chicago’s mayor and the governor of Illinois’ issue. When it gets to the point that they can’t handle it, and asks for help,then that’s a different story.

    Remember how Bush muddied the waters in Louisiana with his visit during Katrina? It wasn’t his fault, but he should have stayed away until asked to intervene. It undermines the authority of the state officials on hand. No one really knew who was in charge then and at one point Bush was even overstepping his authority Too many cooks in the kitchen spoils the stew.

    It’s clearly a Chicago issue at this point and should stay that way without federal intervention as long as possible.

    For the record, I think the teachers are wrong in this case.

    “Perhaps it is the case that when it comes to education, politicians simply don’t give it the priority it deserves.”
    Agreed 100%.

  28. augger said

    “Considering that the Chicago public school system receives tens or possibly even hundreds of millions in federal grants, I would expect stronger intervention by the Administration and the leaders of Congress, and stronger initiatives from Candidate Romney.”

    Interesting. Now here we have the democrats lambasting Romney for speaking up on the matters in Libya, but I find here Jim, that you are castigating the man for staying out of the Chicago politics. Now not that I am a Romney fan, but sure as shit sounds like the poor bastard can’t win for losing. Just saying.

    “It’s Chicago’s mayor and the governor of Illinois’ issue.” – William, you hit a bulls-eye right there my friend.

    “It’s clearly a Chicago issue at this point and should stay that way without federal intervention as long as possible.”

    Strike out “as long as possible”, and I could agree with you 100%.

    But this leads me down a different train of thought …

    I actually feel “just a lil bit” bad for Obama. Then candidate Obama told the Unions he’d put on sneakers and strike with them, and also pushed better education for the students. Now he is caught in cross fire as the teacher’s union has come to the fruition of their plan, and that is diametrically opposed to the needs of the students.

    Who’s side is he going to choose …. tune in. Either way, he’s lied (once again) to someone.

    On second thought, I do not feel bad for the poor chap at all. I think his plight is hilarious. 🙂

  29. William Gates said

    Your wish is my command:

    XXXXXXXXXXX

    Consider “as long as possible” gone.

    Obama should keep his Johnston and Murphy’s on and briskly walk in the opposite direction of this one. He’s probably laughing at ol’ Rahm now.

  30. James McPherson said

    “I have a problem with school teachers going on strike and affecting the lives and careers of young people.”

    Generally speaking, I agree. Striking should absolutely be a last resort for teachers. And I say that as someone who has been too busy with teaching-related stuff to read my own blog for a couple of days. 🙂

    “It’s Chicago’s mayor and the governor of Illinois’ issue.”

    I agree.

    “we have the democrats lambasting Romney for speaking up on the matters in Libya.”

    Not just Dems, of course–some Republicans are also criticizing Romney. And it wasn’t for “speaking up”: it was because what he said was both poorly timed and stupid (not only was he overly political, he wrongly blamed Obama for an embassy employee’s response and got the capital of Libya wrong): http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20120912/POLITICS01/209120376/1361/Romney-criticizes-Obama-in-wake-of-embassy-attacks

    “Perhaps it is the case that when it comes to education, politicians simply don’t give it the priority it deserves.”

    I agree, too. Thanks, all.

  31. augger said

    @ William “He’s probably laughing at ol’ Rahm now.” – He very likely is, for the moment. He’s sure sold ole Rahm down the river.

    @ James – If I had been Romney, I would have responded with a Patriotic message as well. In fact, I did so myself. And for the sake of the discussion, here’s what we all responded to:

    “The Embassy of the United States in Cairo condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims – as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions. Today, the 11th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, Americans are honoring our patriots and those who serve our nation as the fitting response to the enemies of democracy. Respect for religious beliefs is a cornerstone of American democracy. We firmly reject the actions by those who abuse the universal right of free speech to hurt the religious beliefs of others.”

    But of course, this administration only wanted to walk that back after public outcry. Actually, there was little attempt to walk it back, in fact, they just simply tried to erase that statement all together …

    http://egypt.usembassy.gov/pr091112.html
    File not found.

    Here we go again … liberals trying to re-write history to suit their own needs.

  32. Reuel said

    Augger; Exactly. But the only thing I may add is the treatment of other religions by the extremist Muslims usually ends up causing physical body harm and not just a verbal jab. I to support Romney’s statement he made about the Embassy released statement. It was a remark that needed to be made about such a response. Also if anyone thinks these raids were because of a film made by a warped mind 6 months ago were the reason for the attacks on the 11 year marking of 911. That would be a miscalculation and lack of understanding of a faction of a religion that believe we should all be Muslims or die. No matter who wins in November he is going to have to understand that a small group of Muslims want us all died and that is a reality now and even before President Bush was in office. I knew this in the early 1980’s when I traveled the Middle East. They are in a religious war with us and apologizing to them only stirs up these groups that have been indoctrinated from birth to hate all other religions, including some of there more moderate Muslim factions. This is President Obama’s Jimmy Carter moment and he got caught with defenses down on a date that will always be a reason for them to attack us. 911 was a victory for them and they celebrate this day as we remember it. That is what our challenge is and it isn’t a lunatic releasing a 17 minute video that most of the actors have not even seen, because they are indoctrinated from the day they are born to hate us because of our countries freedom of religions other than there accepted belief.

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