James McPherson's Media & Politics Blog

Observations of a patriotic progressive historian, media critic & former journalist


  • By the author of The Conservative Resurgence and the Press: The Media’s Role in the Rise of the Right and of Journalism at the End of the American Century, 1965-Present. A former journalist with a Ph.D. in journalism, history and political science, McPherson is a past president of the American Journalism Historians Association and a board member for the Northwest Alliance for Responsible Media.

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Posts Tagged ‘Jasmine Linabary’

More Whitworthian honors

Posted by James McPherson on April 14, 2010

The student newspaper at Whitworth University has rung up some more regional awards, including being named “Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper” and being cited as having the “Best Affiliated Web Site.” Current opinions editor Jarod Jarvis won the online opinion and commentary category, Aileen Benson placed second for editorial cartooning, and the editorial staff placed second for editorial writing.

I’m less happy with where two other students placed. Jasmine Linabary finished second in the category of online in-depth reporting for her multimedia package on gender at Whitworth. It is simply the best multimedia package I’ve ever seen done by a single journalist, student or professional. Yong Kyle Kim finished third in the same category, with a series about pornography.

So why would I be dissatisfied when Jasmine and Kyle both did so well?  Well, naturally I went online to see what finished first in the category: What I found was a package that had been produced by a team of almost 30 students, three professors and a professional photographer/videographer with a master’s degree who did a multimedia project about the same issue for her master’s thesis.

Worse, as far as I can tell, unless some links have been removed, that woman’s master’s thesis project—an admittedly outstanding package that is linked to the winning project, but which was produced in 2008, outside of the time frame of this year’s competition—provides the only multimedia part of the winning entry.

Finally, of the students involved with the winning project, 16  were law students and two were graduate students. Both Whitworthian projects were produced by individual undergraduate students who were carrying full course loads and serving as student newspaper editors at the same time.

As far as I’m concerned, that makes their achievements far more noteworthy than those of the declared “winners.”

Posted in Politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Pigs now fly: journalism at two levels

Posted by James McPherson on April 28, 2009

You may die. Today. Or, if you’re exposed to swine flu today, maybe next week. Especially if you’re in Mexico City, the 20-million-person “epicenter” of the potential pandemic, where swine flu is “suspected” in 152 deaths, which means the virus may have wiped out almost eight-one-thousandths of one percent of one third-world city’s population.

Gee, I haven’t been this frightened since the last bird flu pandemic, which I suspect killed your entire family. Bad enough that Lou Dobbs told me all the Mexicans wanted to give me leprosy while the druglords kill all my friends in Arizona. Now this.

And yes, I know that influenza can be deadly. All in all, though, you’re still more likely to die by choking on your sandwich today at lunch. But CNN’s top three stories right now (unless you count the White House plane that buzzed New York) are about swine flu.

The main reason for today’s special post, however, if to call your attention to a more responsible form of journalism than much of what we’ve been seeing in the national media. The Whitworthian has just won a number of regional Society of Professional Journalists awards, claiming the top prizes for online journalism, feature writing, general column writing, sports column writing, feature photography and editorial cartooning (for which it also won third prize). It placed second for “best all-around non-daily newspaper.”

The Whitworth student newspaper (which I happen to advise, but it is a totally student-run operation so they deserve all the credit) also recently was named one of 20 finalists for an American Collegiate Press Online Pacemaker Award. The Pacemakers are as good as it gets in college journalism.

The Whitworthian of today offers a lead story about an apparent hate crime near campus and is in the middle of an excellent series about pornography, and this week launches the most ambition project I’ve ever seen conducted by a student journalist–a multi-part multimedia package about gender issues produced by online editor Jasmine Linabary.

So now I’ll duck away from posting for yet another unknown period. But I’m proud to have recognition of some of my top students at the top of my blog. And if you want to read more from them, besides reading the Whitworthian, check out the blogs of this year’s editor-in-chief Joy Bacon, online editor (and last year’s editor-in-chief) Jasmine Linabary, photo editor Derek Casanovas (who blogs about sports), sports editor Danika Heatherly (who doesn’t blog about sports), prize-winning columnist Tim Takechi, and next year’s editor-in-chief Morgan Feddes.

Posted in Education, History, Journalism | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Four reasons newspapers won’t soon disappear

Posted by James McPherson on November 30, 2008

A friend recently reduced his subscription to the local daily, to get it only Wednesdays and Sundays (so he gets the most important ads), while reading online the rest of the week. As much as I love newspapers, I still couldn’t offer him a good reason not to do make the change.

I’ve been reading a lot lately about the decline of print media, and I suspect that my political science professor who predicted in 1993 that print newspapers would disappear “within 10 years” is still making the same prediction. Still, I expect that newspapers will be with us for some time to come, for the following reasons:

  1. Big events. People still turn to print newspapers for coverage of events ranging from elections to mass disasters. Print media provide more depth of coverage than broadcast media, and they also provide a physical reminder of the event. Internet newspapers might provide the former, but I can’t see most people wanting to print out a Web page to save in their family mementos.
  2. Supermarkets and department stores. This weekend provides a big reminder that there is no good alternative for some types of newspaper ads.
  3. Sundays. Too many of us like to peruse the newspaper in a leisurely fashion on Sundays, laughing at the funnies, and trading sections and observations with others whom we care about.
  4. Mass transit, which is necessary in some American cities (and more widespread overseas) and may become increasingly important in the United States if Barack Obama is serious about rebuilding infrastructure while reducing our dependence on oil. Some of the massive subsidies now used to prop up our highway-centric lifestyle might be diverted to more logical transit alternatives. And until handheld devices become as cheap, simple and portable as the New York Post or USA Today, subway riders will turn to print.

Newspapers will continue to change, in many ways not for the better, and the staff cuts at most publications are alarming to those of us who care about journalism and journalists. Some papers will publish less frequently in the future than they do now. Newspapers and other media will increasingly go online, and will figure out new ways to make a profit.

Student Jasmine Linabary, the Pew Research Center and various folks at the Poynter Institute are among those tracking the changes, some of which make the future of media look at least as exciting as it is scary. As for me, you’ll have to excuse me: It’s time to grab a bite and finish the Sunday paper.

Posted in History, Journalism, Media literacy | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »